Burned Out By the PIRG


l. Is there anything else out there?

I often spoke with other PIRG entry level staff what drew them into the job.  Many were former interns in the program, and automatically had an easy in to the organization.   Many had been recruited through information sessions and group interviews with PIRG staff at their college career centers.

But most had accepted a job with PIRG for the simple reason that they wanted to work on advocacy and social change in a nonprofit, but there were no other opportunities available.

Sure, there’s a bit of truth to that explanation.  Finding a job in the nonprofit world can be difficult for the college senior or recent graduate, much more so than going straight into the corporate world or graduate school.

PIRG devotes a staggering amount of money and time on their recruitment process.  If they changed their work culture and environment, they might be able to cut down on these costs,  keep staff around, and raise their salaries.  But a large majority of smaller nonprofit organizations, which are constantly trying to balance their bottom line, simply do not have the same resources to seek out candidates for employment.  Craigslist now charges $25 per job listing in most major American cities – Idealist also charges for job listings.

So where can you really find openings? There are plenty of opportunities out there beyond PIRG – if you have the drive and patience to seek them out.  Many openings at nonprofit organizations are passed around word of mouth, or posted directly on their websites.  Start looking into the local organizations that serve the community you hope to live in after college.  Get yourself out in the community.  Connect with alumni who might work with organizations you are interested in.

Don’t always rely on your career center. Sure, your on-campus career center can teach you a thing or two about the perfect cover letter, a successful interview, and connect you with hundreds of places to work, but don’t depend on them completely.  In the end, how badly you want a job, particularly in the nonprofit world, is up to you.  Sure, the PIRG makes it easy for you by flying out their staff to campuses all around the country and setting up interviews right in your career center, but if you want something else, it’s all on you.

Experience, experience, experience. Sure, a college courseload can be tough stuff.  But if you want to get an edge ahead of other college grads, get involved. Take on leadership positions in on-campus organizations.   INTERN AND VOLUNTEER.  Internships or volunteer positions at nonprofit organizations are particularly key because they get you into the sector.  Even 10 hours per week looks better than none at all.  Most importantly, you have references.

NETWORK. One thing your career center can be really good at, which I touched on before, is putting you within reach of a vast alumni network.  Use it.  Attend community events if you plan on sticking around your college’s city or nearby city.  If you’re interning or volunteering with an organization, attend their events and meet other people in the sector.   Throw yourself out there.